ORIGINAL APPETIZER: TERRINE OF WINTER SQUASH

ORIGINAL APPETIZER: TERRINE OF WINTER SQUASH Friday, January 28, 2011

Sometimes, even in the coldest snap of winter, a terrine of winter squash is a dish best served cold.*

The word “terrine” comes to us from the French, literally meaning “large earthenware pot.” The terrine, then, is the type of pan in which a dish is cooked (your mother probably shaped her meatloaf in one or used one to bake banana bread). But “terrine” can also be used to describe the dish, itself.

Our Terrine of Winter Squash is a seasonal appetizer, and joins our growing menu of options for vegetarians. Made with locally grown butternut squash and leeks (which we poach in butter), our terrine, as you can see, is layered, prior to cooking, with chevre (sorry, vegans) and French chestnuts, and is wrapped, like a delicious present, in Swiss chard. We then sprinkle it liberally with a brown butter powder, which, once it passes your lips, like magic, melts in your mouth. And to finish it off, we slice it, plate it, drizzle it with a bit of Saba—a viscous grape must syrup, both savory and sweet—and serve it cold.

Try some soon because this winter dish won’t be around forever. And also, because it’s really, really good.

*Ha! Get it? Like revenge? Consider this a sort of vegetarian’s revenge. On us. Really, if you’ve cruised our menu, you’ll have noticed that our chef, B.J., loves his meat, especially pork. But he wants you vegetarians to know that he loves you, too. Unless you’re vegan. But not really. No lie: we’re hard at work on making at least one porkless vegan option. Stay tuned…