ORIGINAL STARTERS: THE SCOTCH EGG

ORIGINAL STARTERS: THE SCOTCH EGG Friday, May 04, 2012

The Scotch Egg is back, and this time, it’s plural!

Boiled eggs have long been a pub favorite, but when you boil that egg hard, peel it, dig out its yolk, confit that yolk, bundle that yolk in a sphere of housemade pork sausage, then roll it all in some breading and drop it in the deep fryer?

Well, now you’re speaking a foodie’s language.

Once our Scotch Eggs have been rescued from their bath of boiling oil, we artfully place them upon the pooling edge of a saucy pimento cheddar cheese bed, and crown it all with a small baby arugula salad lightly tossed with our housemade lemon vinaigrette.

Yum.

So upon whom shall we gloriously heap our praise?

We’re not sure. The Scotch Egg’s history is sort of a mystery.  No one knows from where it came. Many say that it must’ve first been made by Scottish farmers who ate them as snacks during their days in the fields. Other say it was invented by a Victorian-era British grocer, which sold them to day London day trippers. The jury remains out, hung and probably at the pub.

And because this is a pub favorite—there’s pretty nothing that pairs with a dark ale quite like an egg does—order up pair of these wonderful little eggs, and why not order up another ale to sip while you tell your tablemates everything you know and don’t know about the tangy, porky, piping hot Scotch Egg.